lesbian-lily:

radicalmayhem:

raptorific:

so much happening here:
Feels a lot like you’re saying all of those things are supposed to be synonyms for “crazy” and “insane,” which is honestly more hurtful to me as a mentally ill person than being called “crazy” or “insane.”
Thanks for starring out the letter A there. If I see those words entirely intact, I’ll probably spin into a manic rage and poop on the floor like a wild animal! Thanks for removing literally one letter so I only have to see 85% of the word, now I don’t have to start foaming at the mouth!
The words “crazy” and “insane” are actually really important words for a lot of mentally ill people, who use it as a necessary shorthand to express concern that our illnesses might be skewing our perceptions of reality. For example, “is it crazy that I’m so worried about this?” is a much more effective thing to say than “is this a legitimate concern, or am I just projecting my own anxieties and paranoia onto the world around me?” Treating “crazy” as an inherently hurtful slur in all contexts (even “just saying it with no context so people know which word you’re talking about” as above) takes away a “real or not real” shorthand from us. 
Seriously this kind of post is so patronizing people stop doing them

I’m convinced that the whole “crazy/psycho/insane is ableist” thing is just a game made up for tumblr points. nobody actually cares about people with mental illness, they just want to be the ~*~MOST PC~*~ and “call you out” for your “ableism.” it’s a superiority thing.

All of the above.
People don’t really give a shit about those of us that live with mental health conditions.  I don’t think I’ve ever heard any of us say that they have issues with those words.  The only time I ever take issue, at all is when someone uses those words against me/to describe me - like when arseholes make a giant list of all the words they believe are synonymous with me.
I can and will call myself ‘crazy’, ‘nuts’, ‘paranoid’, ‘stupid’, ‘pathetic’ etc. because believe it or not, it’s me that gets to describe my mental health, my experiences and my life.

lesbian-lily:

radicalmayhem:

raptorific:

so much happening here:

  1. Feels a lot like you’re saying all of those things are supposed to be synonyms for “crazy” and “insane,” which is honestly more hurtful to me as a mentally ill person than being called “crazy” or “insane.”
  2. Thanks for starring out the letter A there. If I see those words entirely intact, I’ll probably spin into a manic rage and poop on the floor like a wild animal! Thanks for removing literally one letter so I only have to see 85% of the word, now I don’t have to start foaming at the mouth!
  3. The words “crazy” and “insane” are actually really important words for a lot of mentally ill people, who use it as a necessary shorthand to express concern that our illnesses might be skewing our perceptions of reality. For example, “is it crazy that I’m so worried about this?” is a much more effective thing to say than “is this a legitimate concern, or am I just projecting my own anxieties and paranoia onto the world around me?” Treating “crazy” as an inherently hurtful slur in all contexts (even “just saying it with no context so people know which word you’re talking about” as above) takes away a “real or not real” shorthand from us. 
  4. Seriously this kind of post is so patronizing people stop doing them

I’m convinced that the whole “crazy/psycho/insane is ableist” thing is just a game made up for tumblr points. nobody actually cares about people with mental illness, they just want to be the ~*~MOST PC~*~ and “call you out” for your “ableism.” it’s a superiority thing.

All of the above.

People don’t really give a shit about those of us that live with mental health conditions.  I don’t think I’ve ever heard any of us say that they have issues with those words.  The only time I ever take issue, at all is when someone uses those words against me/to describe me - like when arseholes make a giant list of all the words they believe are synonymous with me.

I can and will call myself ‘crazy’, ‘nuts’, ‘paranoid’, ‘stupid’, ‘pathetic’ etc. because believe it or not, it’s me that gets to describe my mental health, my experiences and my life.

4,139 notes

libertarianloki:

dumblr—feminist:

theanticlimactic:

poppypicklesticks:

theanticlimactic:

poppypicklesticks:

socialjusticeprincesses:

eee-in:

katvonci:

nomediocre:

lustt-and-luxury:

Crazy girlfriends be like ..

!!

Do your thang boo boo.💋

If you actually think in any way that what this psycho cunt did was even remotely ok you’re just as big of a piece of shit as she is.

if a man did this to his ex girlfriend, you’d all be screaming mysogyny and male entitlement and “this is why we need feminism” and something about rape culture.

~ Mulan

"do your thing boo boo"

We all know what that nasty little snatch would be saying if the genders were reversed.

Um isn’t this all made up???

Looks fake

But even if it is, the reactions people have to it on here speaks volumes about the double standards so many have about domestic violence regarding males. 

I’m really hoping they’re kidding…. I mean I’m down for jokes about anything and I’m hoping those people arent serious but I don’t fucking know anything anymore

Fake or real the fucking assholes on this site obviously rejoice that a female beat the crap out of a guy they don’t care. They think it’s AWESOME when people get hurt and women are involved. It’s gross.

(Source: madeupmonkeyshit, via it-goes-both-ways)

44,526 notes

nemns:

I’m sorry, but anyone who thinks Five Nights at Freddy’s is scary must have never experienced the horror of Billy Bob and all the rest of the Rock-afire Explosion gang as a kid… No actually I’m not sorry this shit still gives me nightmares and I’m 28

nemns:

I’m sorry, but anyone who thinks Five Nights at Freddy’s is scary must have never experienced the horror of Billy Bob and all the rest of the Rock-afire Explosion gang as a kid… No actually I’m not sorry this shit still gives me nightmares and I’m 28

13 notes

steel-samurai-maya-smelting:

skyshale1:

God forgive me for going against the flow.

really just don’t like Eliza all that much for Skullgirls.

Not like, game play wise, but just personality wise.

Where as at the end of Cerabella’s campaign, she at least felt fucking remorseful for all the things she’d done to get where she was (even the fucking hat felt bad, hows about that?) but at the end of Eliza’s campaign, she feels no remorse at all, in fact she feels so little she immediately takes over the fucking earth after she’s done.

And no offence, but she’s wayyyy too cocky for her own good, her ego alone could only be surpassed by that of Duke Nukem’ and the fucking says something, she believes that she’s absolutely invincible and that fact alone is just enough to get me all riled up over any character, then the way she is portrayed in the end is pretty dumb as well, if she had all that power, she could have easily taken the world over single handedly years ago, and that is one plot point that has always pissed me off.

Overall, I think that, I would have liked her better if she wasn’t written the way she was or the tropes that were used in her campaign.

I mean, yeah,

that is all entirely on purpose (except maybe about the part about taking over the world sooner).

She’s a villain, she is meant to be unlikeable.

I think she was actually supposed to be the final boss of the theoretical Skullgirls 2.

I don’t think you’re going to get a lot of flack for disliking a character specifically written to be dislikable.

Yeah. This is like complaining that Ragyo Kiryuuin doesn’t have any redeeming qualities, when the lack of them is more or less the entire point of the character.

6 notes

Gov. Brown Signs Bill Telling CA College Kids Where, When to Have Sex

To collectivist feminists, doomsayers of the “rape is an ever-worsening epidemic” variety, and other puritans: Your so-called progressivism has restored Victorian Era prudishness to its former place as a guiding moral compass.

poison303:

“Rock and roll is a fixation on that bom-bom-bom mother heartbeat. I don’t want to hypnotize, I’m doing a non-hypnotic music to break up the catatonic state.”
  Captain Beefheart

poison303:

“Rock and roll is a fixation on that bom-bom-bom mother heartbeat. I don’t want to hypnotize, I’m doing a non-hypnotic music to break up the catatonic state.”

  Captain Beefheart

26 notes

it-goes-both-ways:

talesof4chan:

/mu/tant goes to a local indie concerttalesof4chan.tumblr.com

I’d hope this wasn’t real but I’ve seen worse actually recorded.

it-goes-both-ways:

talesof4chan:

/mu/tant goes to a local indie concert
talesof4chan.tumblr.com

I’d hope this wasn’t real but I’ve seen worse actually recorded.

318 notes

it-goes-both-ways:

wordsmithapprentice:

lejacquelope:

listener-blue:

This is going to turn into a very long post, I can feel it.
So yeah, ok. I can see the point being made here. I doubt anyone would argue that child labour and being called bossy are in any way comparable.
I can also see there is a wider point being made about HeforShe and the fact that it is focused on helping women, and on asking men to help women, when there are terrible situations for men and boys across the globe that are being ignored. Fair point.
I also did feel at this point in the speech that Emma Watson would never have thought of adding this had the ‘Ban Bossy’ campaign not existed. I know that sounds very cynical, it was just a thought I had. It has probably not occurred to her that maybe she was called bossy because she was being bossy - maybe the boys who wanted to take charge were not doing it in a domineering manner? Who knows, none of us were there.. it may indeed have stemmed from sexism for all I know. There is a difference between stopping someone from taking charge of a situation because of their gender and checking problematic behaviour - a point Ban Bossy completely missed, and my main problem with the campaign.
But the problem I have with this post is that it implies that we should not talk about these more minor incidences of sexism so long as greater ones exist. We therefore cannot talk about gender roles in any manner. Because being told to ‘man up’ is in no way comparable to child labour, is it? Being told you can’t achieve something because you’re ‘just a girl’ is in no way comparable to being sold into sex slavery, is it? So what - we can’t talk about these things at all now?
I suppose I had quite a traditional upbringing, or at least my parents slotted perfectly into their traditional roles. And yes, they did pass that on to myself and my brother. At mealtimes I was expected to help with the cooking, setting the table, washing up and so on. My brother was not expected or asked to do any of these things, or indeed any form of housework. This stung particularly hard at Christmas when I would help my mum in the kitchen while my brother was allowed to relax and play with his toys. Was it wrong of me to feel this way? Was it wrong of me to explain to my parents that I felt it was a double standard? Because somewhere in the world there are boys in a far far worse situation than me, was I wrong to feel this was unfair?
And if we look at some of the issues men and women face in western society then of course they stem from these ‘minor’ incidences. And I am sure the same is true across the globe. We continually question, for example, why suicide rates for men are so much higher than for women. But if we look at the root of that problem, is it not possible that it stems from exactly these sorts of things - being told from a young age that you should keep your emotions in check, that it is not ‘manly’ to cry, that your feelings don’t matter has a massive knock on effect in later life. We buy into the lies our parents and society tell us about how we ‘should’ act because of our gender. So if a man feels helpless then who will he turn to, who will he share his emotions with, whose shoulder will he cry on? Nobody. Because that is not the ‘manly’ thing to do. The importance of these ‘minor’ things should not be underestimated, please lets not start that.
And finally - do we not despise it when feminists use this very form of argument? Men’s issues do not matter because women have it ‘worse’ is something we often hear, and always decry. If we start thinking like that then we become the exact thing we hate about the feminist movement. 
If we have a problem with this particular part of the speech (and my dislike of Ban Bossy is laid out above) then fair enough, point that out. But if any mention of gender stereotypes by feminists is going to be met with the cry of ‘boys/men in this country have this much larger problem and therefore that problem is insignificant’ then I do sort of feel like it becomes more about defeating feminism than about making the larger point. Yes - there is a point to be made in this post, as I mention. But surely we can make that point without basically mocking these ‘smaller’ issues. We spend a lot of effort trying to include the issues related to the male gender role in the gender equality conversation, and pointing out how detrimental they can be to men and boys. Is it not a touch hypocritical to then imply that girls and women shouldn’t talk about the ways in which they feel they have been treated differently because of their gender?

I won’t hassle with the whole ‘bossy is/isn’t a bad word’ thing because your greater point seems to be that mocking smaller issues isn’t right, and that ignoring misogyny is no different than ignoring misandry, and if that’s the case, I’m with you 100%.

I did not really get that from this image. I would agree mocking smaller issues to gain attention for larger ones would be wrong.
However, that’s not what you are seeing here.
They are mocking a NON-issue.
It’s not a problem when little girls are required to learn and understand the difference between actions that can be defined as leadership, and those that can be defined as selfish, controlling behavior, or in other words, bossiness.
It is in fact, a feature of any good sort of education on how to be a person, and interact with the rest of society.
People tell bossy boys to quit it just as quickly. I should know, I was one. It’s a good thing they told me to quit it too. I would surely be insufferable by now if they had not.
In fact, I am willing to bet that if I still thought that way I would have neither job, nor lover, nor friends.
On the other hand, if somebody had made me dig ditches since I was 10, I would be pretty unlikely to have any sort of education at all.
I sure would not be an international superstar speaking to millions, and neither would Emma, if she had had the same background.
What this image says to me is this.
Money time and attention are wasted on trying to make the lives of upper class wealthy white girls even more painless than they already are.
We need to focus on the hell little brown boys go through if we want to claim we care about all people equally.

Hasn’t it always been the way that rich, upper class white women felt the most oppressed despite being the most privileged and having the fewest responsibilities. Many suffragettes were convinced they weren’t “allowed” to work while being utterly ignorant of the lower class women doing everything the lower class men were.

it-goes-both-ways:

wordsmithapprentice:

lejacquelope:

listener-blue:

This is going to turn into a very long post, I can feel it.

So yeah, ok. I can see the point being made here. I doubt anyone would argue that child labour and being called bossy are in any way comparable.

I can also see there is a wider point being made about HeforShe and the fact that it is focused on helping women, and on asking men to help women, when there are terrible situations for men and boys across the globe that are being ignored. Fair point.

I also did feel at this point in the speech that Emma Watson would never have thought of adding this had the ‘Ban Bossy’ campaign not existed. I know that sounds very cynical, it was just a thought I had. It has probably not occurred to her that maybe she was called bossy because she was being bossy - maybe the boys who wanted to take charge were not doing it in a domineering manner? Who knows, none of us were there.. it may indeed have stemmed from sexism for all I know. There is a difference between stopping someone from taking charge of a situation because of their gender and checking problematic behaviour - a point Ban Bossy completely missed, and my main problem with the campaign.

But the problem I have with this post is that it implies that we should not talk about these more minor incidences of sexism so long as greater ones exist. We therefore cannot talk about gender roles in any manner. Because being told to ‘man up’ is in no way comparable to child labour, is it? Being told you can’t achieve something because you’re ‘just a girl’ is in no way comparable to being sold into sex slavery, is it? So what - we can’t talk about these things at all now?

I suppose I had quite a traditional upbringing, or at least my parents slotted perfectly into their traditional roles. And yes, they did pass that on to myself and my brother. At mealtimes I was expected to help with the cooking, setting the table, washing up and so on. My brother was not expected or asked to do any of these things, or indeed any form of housework. This stung particularly hard at Christmas when I would help my mum in the kitchen while my brother was allowed to relax and play with his toys. Was it wrong of me to feel this way? Was it wrong of me to explain to my parents that I felt it was a double standard? Because somewhere in the world there are boys in a far far worse situation than me, was I wrong to feel this was unfair?

And if we look at some of the issues men and women face in western society then of course they stem from these ‘minor’ incidences. And I am sure the same is true across the globe. We continually question, for example, why suicide rates for men are so much higher than for women. But if we look at the root of that problem, is it not possible that it stems from exactly these sorts of things - being told from a young age that you should keep your emotions in check, that it is not ‘manly’ to cry, that your feelings don’t matter has a massive knock on effect in later life. We buy into the lies our parents and society tell us about how we ‘should’ act because of our gender. So if a man feels helpless then who will he turn to, who will he share his emotions with, whose shoulder will he cry on? Nobody. Because that is not the ‘manly’ thing to do. The importance of these ‘minor’ things should not be underestimated, please lets not start that.

And finally - do we not despise it when feminists use this very form of argument? Men’s issues do not matter because women have it ‘worse’ is something we often hear, and always decry. If we start thinking like that then we become the exact thing we hate about the feminist movement. 

If we have a problem with this particular part of the speech (and my dislike of Ban Bossy is laid out above) then fair enough, point that out. But if any mention of gender stereotypes by feminists is going to be met with the cry of ‘boys/men in this country have this much larger problem and therefore that problem is insignificant’ then I do sort of feel like it becomes more about defeating feminism than about making the larger point. Yes - there is a point to be made in this post, as I mention. But surely we can make that point without basically mocking these ‘smaller’ issues. We spend a lot of effort trying to include the issues related to the male gender role in the gender equality conversation, and pointing out how detrimental they can be to men and boys. Is it not a touch hypocritical to then imply that girls and women shouldn’t talk about the ways in which they feel they have been treated differently because of their gender?

I won’t hassle with the whole ‘bossy is/isn’t a bad word’ thing because your greater point seems to be that mocking smaller issues isn’t right, and that ignoring misogyny is no different than ignoring misandry, and if that’s the case, I’m with you 100%.

I did not really get that from this image. I would agree mocking smaller issues to gain attention for larger ones would be wrong.

However, that’s not what you are seeing here.

They are mocking a NON-issue.

It’s not a problem when little girls are required to learn and understand the difference between actions that can be defined as leadership, and those that can be defined as selfish, controlling behavior, or in other words, bossiness.

It is in fact, a feature of any good sort of education on how to be a person, and interact with the rest of society.

People tell bossy boys to quit it just as quickly. I should know, I was one. It’s a good thing they told me to quit it too. I would surely be insufferable by now if they had not.

In fact, I am willing to bet that if I still thought that way I would have neither job, nor lover, nor friends.

On the other hand, if somebody had made me dig ditches since I was 10, I would be pretty unlikely to have any sort of education at all.

I sure would not be an international superstar speaking to millions, and neither would Emma, if she had had the same background.

What this image says to me is this.

Money time and attention are wasted on trying to make the lives of upper class wealthy white girls even more painless than they already are.

We need to focus on the hell little brown boys go through if we want to claim we care about all people equally.

Hasn’t it always been the way that rich, upper class white women felt the most oppressed despite being the most privileged and having the fewest responsibilities. Many suffragettes were convinced they weren’t “allowed” to work while being utterly ignorant of the lower class women doing everything the lower class men were.

(Source: notallfeminists)

1,382 notes

plebcomics:

for your convenience, a cheat-sheet of (most) the sjw buzzwords youre likely to come across while browsing tumblr

plebcomics:

for your convenience, a cheat-sheet of (most) the sjw buzzwords youre likely to come across while browsing tumblr

(via it-goes-both-ways)

1,823 notes

check-your-privilege-feminists:

Why is Feminism Such a Dirty Word: Part 1

(all credit goes to justfeministhings)

(via it-goes-both-ways)

2,253 notes